Enter Keyword and Search






Sunday, July 10, 2011

Distribution and collection of phone bills of BSNL through line staff

with 0 Comment

Distribution and collection of phone bills of BSNL through line staff


 
BHARAT SANCHAR NIGAM LIMITED
(A Government of India Enterprise)
Corporate Office (Revenue Management Branch - CFA)
2nd floor, Room No. 216, Eastern Court, Janpath,
NEW DELHI-110 001

To

    All Heads of Telecom Circles/Metro Telephone Districts
    Bharat Sanchar Nigam Limited.

No.2-4/2006-BSNL/TR/Pt.     

dated: 24-06-2011.

Subject: Distribution and collection of phone bills of BSNL through line staff.

    Kind reference is invited to this office letter of even No. dated 12-09-2008 through which the approval of Competent Authority was conveyed for allowing line staff to collect and distribute phone bills of BSNL on the incentive rate of  Rs.2/- (Two) per bill for delivery and Rs.3/- (Three) per bill for collection, on certain terms and conditions as indicated therein.

    The instructions contained in the letter mentioned above are hereby re-iterated for wide circulation in all the SSAs of your Circle, so that the benefit of the scheme is availed off by maximum members of the line staff. 

    Moreover, it has been desired to have monthly reports on achievement made through the scheme from all Circles (SSA wise), for the ensuing three months i.e., July, August and September 2011. It is requested to ensure that the reports for these three months are sent to this office positively by 15th on the month following the month of report in the format given below.


       (G. P. Verma)
GM (Finance) CFA


FORMAT

Report on distribution and collection of phone bills through Line staff

Name of the Circle: __________________                                                                                         Month of Report: ____________________

Name of SSA Total No. of Phone bills issued during the month  No. of bills distributed by Line staff during the month No. of bills collected by Line staff during the month Amount of incentive Paid to staff for distribution and collection of bills during the month
         
         
         
         
         
         
         

                           
                
Source: BSNLEUCHQ

Eligibility of permanently disabled son of a Central Government Health Service (CGHS) beneficiary to avail CGHS facility- reg.

with 0 Comment

 

CGHS facility for disability clarified

           Eligibility of permanently disabled son of a Central Government Health Service (CGHS) beneficiary to avail CGHS facility has been clarified with respect to schizophrenia as a disability. It is clarified that schizophrenia is a case of mental disorder and falls within the definition of disability as defined in Section 2 (i) of The Persons  with  Disabilities (Equal Opportunities, Protection of Rights and Full Participation) Act, 1995 (No.1 of 1996) and is covered by the terms `mental retardation' and `mental illness'.

Retirement age across the world - ILC Report

with 2 comments

 

Retirement age across the world - ILC Report

Policy Reforms in Ageing Health and Innovation in OECD Countries

NON-HEALTH RELATED

Pension Reform 

One very common policy response to increased longevity is pension reform to ensure the future sustainability of pension systems while ensuring that older people receive adequate retirement income (OECD, 2009). The most common measures taken are raising the state pension age, scrapping or limiting the possibility of early retirement and encouraging personal (individual/employer) pension provision (OECD, 2009; OECD, 2006).

Almost all OECD countries have made changes to state pension age; those with a state pension age below 65 are in the process of raising it such as Japan, Korea and the Czech Republic, whereas countries such as the UK, Germany, Denmark and the Netherlands that already have a state pension age of 65 are increasing it (OECD, 2009; Guardian, 2010). However, it is important to note that most while the state pension age guides retirement, many people retire before reaching it, while others choose to continue working (Berry, 2010).
 
Many countries including Portugal, Turkey, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and Sweden have cut future benefits, although many have targeted cuts so that poorer people are not adversely affected (OECD, 2007). A number of OECD countries, such as France, Hungary, Poland, Portugal and Germany have made personal pension provision more attractive through favourable tax treatment, while other countries such as New Zealand and the UK have introduced or are introducing opt-out personal pension schemes for people without access to employer based schemes (OECD, 2009). 

When it comes to incentivising early or later retirement, there are differences (OECD, 2009). Countries can however take different options; for example Germany retains state funded early retirement which acts as an incentive, whereas the UK abolished it a long time ago and incentivises people to retire later by improving pension entitlements for those who defer their state pension (Muller-Camen et al, 2011). 

While some OECD countries such as the USA do not have a default retirement age, many do. Until recently, the UK had a default retirement age of 65, which meant that an employee could be forced to retire at 65 even if they did not want to (BIS, 2011) The scrapping of the default retirement age was warmly welcomed by older people’s organisations and trade unions and cautiously welcomed by employers; retirement will now become the subject of negotiation between employee and employer (BBC News, 2010a).

State pension age in OECD countries

Country

Male

Female

Change

planned?

Notes

Australia

65

63

Yes

Women's pension age will gradually rise to 65 by 2014 and both will increase to 67 in stages between 2017 and 2023.

Austria

65

60

No

 

Belgium

65

65

No

 

Canada

65

65

No

The normal pension eligibility is age 65 but an early pension can be claimed from age 60.

Chile

65

60

No

 

Czech Republic

62

61

Yes

Retirement age will be increased for men to 63 years from 2016 and for women without children from 2019 and to age 59 to 62 for women with children (depending on number of children they have raised).

Denmark

65

65

Yes

Government propose to raise the age to 67 over an eight year period starting in 2017.

Finland

63

63

No

Under the Employees' Pension Act (TYEL) the retirement age is 63 to 68 years.

France

60

60

Yes

Will be raised to 62 over the next eight years.

Germany

65

65

Yes

This will increase to age 67 between 2012 and 2029. It is possible in some circumstances to retire at 63 years.

Greece

65

60

Yes

There are plans to increase women's age to 65 years.

Hungary

62

62

Yes

Retirement age will increase to age 65 for men from 2018 and for women from 2020.

Iceland

65

65

No

This is for the public sector. The legal retirement age for private sector employees is 67.

Ireland

65

65

No

There is no fixed retirement age for employees. There is a statutory retirement age of generally 65 for some public servants.

Italy

65

60

No

 

Japan

60

60

Yes

The pension age is gradually being increased to 65, between 2001 and 2013 for men and between 2006 and 2018 for women.

Korea (Republic of)

60

60

Yes

The pension age is being increased gradually and will reach age 65 by 2033.

Luxembourg

65

65

No

Normal retirement age is 65 but early retirement at 57 is possible.

Mexico

65

65

No

Normal retirement age is 65 years but early retirement is available from age 60.

Netherlands

65

65

Yes

There are plans to increase the retirement age to 67.

New Zealand

65

65

No

 

Norway

67

67

No

60% of employees are entitled to early retirement from the age of 62 years under the early retirement plan.

Poland

65

60

No

There are some professions that are entitled to earlier retirement such as teachers and armed forces.

Portugal

65

65

No

Early retirement is possible in some circumstances from the age of 55 years.

Slovakia

62

57

Yes

The retirement age for women is currently increasing to 62 years by 2014 so that both sexes will be equalised

Spain

65

65

No

 

Sweden

61

61

No

The retirement age is flexible, state pensions can be claimed from age of 61 years.

Switzerland

65

64

No

 

Turkey

60

58

Yes

There are plans to increase the retirement age in stages from 2035 to age 65 for both men and women.

United Kingdom

65

60

Yes

The retirement age for women is being increased between 2010 – 2020 to 65 years. State pension will rise to age 66 in 2024, age 67 in 2034 and age 68 in 2044.

United States

66

66

Yes

Increasing to age 67 in stages.

Source: Guardian (2010)

 

Source:http://www.globalcoalitiononaging.com/v2/data/uploads/documents/ilc-uk-ihp.pdf



Disclaimer:As and when orders amending the rules are published by the Government, the amendment orders will be published in our blog immediately. Readers are requested to refer to the source link is given at the end of the post. All efforts have been made to ensure accuracy of the content on this blog, the same should not be construed as a statement of law or used for any legal purposes. 90paisa accepts no responsibility in relation to the accuracy, completeness, usefulness or otherwise, of the contents. Users are advised to verify/check any information with the relevant department(s) and/or other source(s), and to obtain any appropriate professional advice before acting on the information provided in the blog. Links to other websites that have been included on this blog are provided for public convenience only. 90paisa is not responsible for the contents or reliability of linked websites and does not necessarily endorse the view expressed within them. We cannot guarantee the availability of such linked pages at all times.

Recent Posts